Reading's Thompson tosses three-hit shutout

Phillies No. 2 prospect dominates in Eastern League semifinals for Fightin Phils

Reading's Thompson tosses three-hit shutout

Jake Thompson couldn't have picked a better time to throw the first shutout of his career.

The Phillies' No. 2 prospect scattered three hits over nine scoreless innings Friday in a 3-0 win against Binghamton, giving Double-A Reading a 2-0 series advantage in the best-of-five Eastern League semifinals. He issued one walk and struck out eight, throwing 66 of 108 pitches for strikes.

Thompson, baseball's No. 55 overall prospect, had completed eight innings just once in his four-year Minor League career before Friday's outing, while it was the 10th time in 72 starts in which he's struck out at least eight batters.

"I threw a lot of strikes, got ahead in counts and was able to get them to put balls in play. And the defense made every play behind me," Thompson told MiLB.com. "I was throwing good pitches in the bottom of the zone and was able to use off-speed early in the count to get ground-ball outs."

The 21-year-old right-hander was outstanding after coming over from the Rangers in the Cole Hamels deal, going 5-1 with a 1.80 ERA, 1.00 WHIP, 34 strikeouts and 12 walks in 45 innings over his final seven regular-season starts.

Thompson's performance down the stretch was particularly encouraging after his up-and-down showing in the Texas League, where he pitched to a 4.72 ERA and 1.41 WHIP in 87 2/3 innings (17 starts) for Double-A Frisco.

Overall, the 6-foot-4, 235-pounder registered a 3.73 ERA, 1.27 WHIP and 112/42 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 132 2/3 innings during the regular season, making 24 starts between Frisco and Reading.

Thompson's effort was aided by a solo home run from Phillies No. 3 prospect (No. 59 overall) Nick Williams -- also acquired from the Rangers in the Hamels blockbuster -- who went 2-for-5 in his third game back from the disabled list (concussion).

Mike Rosenbaum is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.