At home, Yanks thrive in doubleheaders

At home, Yanks thrive in doubleheaders

Due to inclement weather in New York on Thursday, the Yankees and Blue Jays will play a crucial single-admission doubleheader on Saturday as they battle for supremacy in the American League East. Toronto holds a 1 1/2-game division advantage heading into the opener of the four-game series, which was pushed back to Friday at Yankee Stadium.

The good news for the Yankees is that over the years they have enjoyed success in doubleheaders, especially at home, though they have yet to play one in 2015. Going into Saturday's twin bill, slated to begin at 1:05 p.m. ET, New York has hosted 39 since 1990, racking up 19 sweeps and 15 splits. This total doesn't include three Subway Series doubleheaders against the Mets in which each team hosted one game.

Going back to 1990, the Yankees have dropped both ends of a home doubleheader only five times, but four of those came between 1990-95. The most recent instance was against the Red Sox on Sept. 17, 2006, a day after the two teams split another two-for-one affair. Since then, the Yankees have gone 11 home doubleheaders without enduring a sweep, winning both games on seven of those occasions. Last season, they swept the Cubs on April 16 and split with the Pirates on May 18 at Yankee Stadium but dropped both games to the Orioles on Sept. 12 in Baltimore.

In the only two Yankees-Jays doubleheaders since 1990, New York completed sweeps of Toronto in the Bronx on both Sept. 19, 2012, and Aug. 20, 2013.

Because their stadium has a roof, the Blue Jays rarely have played home doubleheaders, with their only one in the past 25 years coming on Oct. 5, 2001, a sweep over the Indians.

In 25 road doubleheaders since 1990, Toronto has managed to win both games only twice, and not since Sept. 9, 2008, against the White Sox. The Jays have earned 14 splits, including this June 2 at Washington, and lost a pair nine times.

Andrew Simon is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @AndrewSimonMLB. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.