Janish steps up on both sides of ball

Shortstop enters in third after Jones' exit, impresses with bat, glove

Janish steps up on both sides of ball

KANSAS CITY -- Paul Janish didn't start Thursday's game, but he was still one of few Orioles' bright spots in Thursday's 5-3 series loss to the Royals.

Janish, who entered the game in the top of the third inning to bat for the injured Adam Jones, gave Baltimore its first hit off starter Yordano Ventura. He also had a leadoff single in the sixth, accounting for both of the O's hits over Ventura's six innings.

"I was not expecting to get in the game. I guess it worked out OK -- the ambush was a good tactic," Janish said of facing Ventura. "It's unfortunate. I haven't heard about Adam, but I hope that he's OK."

Janish's calling card has always been his glove, and he also showcased some impressive defense with a pair of spectacular plays at shortstop.

Added to the roster with Steve Clevenger going on paternity -- and J.J. Hardy's injury making another shortstop necessary -- Janish made a diving grab up the the middle in the bottom of the fifth inning to turn an inning-ending double play. He also made a leaping catch on Omar Infante in the eighth.

Janish's leaping grab

"I think more than anything, it's [as] advertised," manager Buck Showalter said of Janish's defense. "Paulie is a pro, and he's a very proactive defender. He can see the ball hit, and he's already moving, and he can throw from a lot of different angles. He's as good of a shortstop as you'll want to see."

"I guess it's how you're advertised, right?," Janish said with a grin when told of Showalter's remark. "It's good from my point of view because I take a lot of pride in that, and over the course of my career, it's been a good feather in my cap. So I know that he's indicating to me that he has confidence in me, which for me is a good thing."

Brittany Ghiroli is a reporter for MLB.com. Read her blog, Britt's Bird Watch, follow her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli, and listen to her podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.