MLB.com Columnist

Fred Zinkie

Pirates stack could sink Miami

Pirates stack could sink Miami

Welcome to DraftKings fantasy baseball, the Official Daily Fantasy Game of Major League Baseball.

The players listed below could provide difference-making stats for DraftKings participants on Tuesday.

Bryce Harper (Nationals): Hitting .330 with 31 homers and 74 RBIs across 400 at-bats, the outfielder has been one of the most powerful, productive hitters in baseball this season. Harper could rip a round-tripper when he brings his career .934 OPS against right-handers (.769 vs. lefties) into a matchup with Padres righty James Shields (1.4 HR/9 rate in 2015).

Curtis Granderson (Mets): With a lifetime .862 OPS against right-handers (.690 vs. lefties), the outfielder could succeed at the dish when he faces Jerome Williams (career 4.57 ERA, 1.39 WHIP) at Philadelphia's hitter-friendly venue. Granderson may also swipe his 12th base of the season against catcher Carlos Ruiz, who has thwarted 10 of 53 would-be base stealers in 2015.

Yoenis Cespedes (Mets): With balanced career splits, the outfielder could drive in multiple runs against Williams (6.10 ERA, 1.67 WHIP in 2015) and a Phillies bullpen that lacks a reliable bridge to closer Ken Giles. Also of note: Cespedes and his teammates will attempt to put balls into play against a Phillies squad that ranks last in baseball with a .667 defensive efficiency ratio.

Adam Lind (Brewers): This season, the first baseman -- who owns a career .865 OPS against right-handers that exceeds his .586 mark vs. lefties -- has hit .301 with 17 homers and 61 RBIs across 316 at-bats against righties. Lind could go deep when he faces the Indians' homer-prone righty Josh Tomlin (career 1.4 HR/9 rate).

Michael Brantley (Indians): Since the start of last season, the outfielder has produced a difference-making .331/.393/.515 slash line against right-handers. Brantley -- who has compiled 29 homers and 36 steals since the outset of 2014 -- will be poised to reach base often or drive in multiple runs when he hits at home against Brewers righty Wily Peralta (4.48 ERA, 1.47 WHIP in 2015).

Andrew McCutchen (Pirates): With a lifetime .327/.414/.567 slash line against left-handers, McCutchen has proven to be among the best in baseball during those matchups. The outfielder will be poised to thrive when he faces Marlins southpaw Brad Hand (career 4.43 ERA, 1.37 WHIP).

Starling Marte (Pirates): With 15 homers and 25 steals across 476 plate appearances this season, the outfielder possesses the diverse skill set that DraftKings participants covet. Marte could contribute in multiple ways when he brings his career .922 OPS against left-handers (.760 vs. righties) into a matchup with Hand (4.46 ERA, 1.30 WHIP in 2015).

Aramis Ramirez (Pirates): The third baseman has produced an .890 OPS against left-handers that exceeds his .817 mark against righties. Ramirez could be part of a Pirates stack -- along with McCutchen, Marte and catcher Francisco Cervelli -- against Hand.

Dee Gordon (Marlins): The second baseman could reach base often when he brings his career .704 OPS against right-handers (.658 vs. lefties) into a matchup with Pirates righty Charlie Morton (career 4.45 ERA, 1.44 WHIP). Gordon could also swipe his 42nd base of the season against Cervelli, who has allowed more steals than any other catcher in baseball this year.

Josh Donaldson (Blue Jays): With a lofty lifetime .300/.380/.605 slash line against left-handers, Donaldson has proven to wield a potent bat in those matchups. The third baseman may be worth a notable expenditure in DraftKings contests when he faces Rangers southpaw Derek Holland (career 4.23 ERA, 1.32 WHIP) at hitter-friendly Globe Life Park in Arlington.

Troy Tulowitzki (Blue Jays): As a big leaguer, Tulowitzki has handled left-handers to the tune of a .958 OPS (.853 vs. righties). From his perch atop the lineup, the shortstop may maximize his opportunities to contribute against Holland and a Rangers bullpen that ranks 27th in baseball with a 4.43 ERA.

Jose Abreu (White Sox): Since debuting in the Majors last season, the first baseman has excelled against left-handers to the tune of a .305/.384/.542 slash line. Abreu could drive in multiple runs when he faces southpaw Wade Miley (4.41 ERA, 1.35 WHIP in 2015) and a Red Sox relief corps that ranks 24th in baseball with a 4.22 ERA.

Kendrys Morales (Royals): Morales -- who is tied for third in the Junior Circuit with 85 RBIs -- could improve on his lifetime .813 OPS against right-handers (.721 vs. lefties) when he faces Orioles fly-ball-prone righty Miguel Gonzalez. The right-handed hurler has posted a career 1.3 HR/9 rate that includes a 1.6 mark this season.

Nathan Karns (Rays): With a season-to-date 3.44 ERA, Karns has been a cost-effective second starter in DraftKings contests on many occasions. The right-hander could compile quality frames when he works at his pitcher-friendly home park against a Twins lineup that ranks 24th in the Majors with a .694 OPS vs. righties. Karns may also benefit from working in front of a Rays squad that sits second in baseball with a .705 defensive efficiency ratio.

Stephen Strasburg (Nationals): With a 1.26 ERA and a 0.76 WHIP across his past six starts, Strasburg is back on track after a rough start to the season. The right-hander -- who owns a lifetime 10.3 K/9 rate -- could post a difference-making total in DraftKings contests when he works at his pitcher-friendly home park against a Padres lineup that ranks 25th in the Majors with a .690 OPS vs. righties.

Noah Syndergaard (Mets): With a 3.17 ERA and a 1.14 WHIP across 18 starts, the rookie righty has been a notable factor in several recent DraftKings contests. Syndergaard could spin a gem when he faces a Phillies lineup that sits 27th in baseball with a .683 OPS vs. righties. He could also come away with a win if his supporting cast can extend Williams' season-long struggles.

All statistics are accurate through the completion of Sunday's games.

Fred Zinkie is the lead fantasy baseball writer for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @FredZinkieMLB. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.