Narveson's sharpness cuts down Cards

Narveson's sharpness cuts down Cards

MILWAUKEE -- When the night began, Tuesday's game meant far more to the Cardinals than the Brewers. That all changed when Trevor Hoffman entered in the ninth.

With a two-run lead, the Brewers called Hoffman's number, setting him up for career save No. 600. Hoffman delivered as he pitched a scoreless ninth in the Brewers' 4-2 victory over the Cardinals at Miller Park.

Before Hoffman's historic 600th save, the game was highlighted by a number of unusual happenings on the field.

Brewers manager Ken Macha was tossed by second-base umpire Tim Timmons, and Brewers center fielder Chris Dickerson, Cardinals pitching coach Dave Duncan and then a male fan sitting in the stands near home plate were all ejected by home-plate umpire Bob Davidson.

"It was an interesting evening," Macha said. "One coach, one manager, one player and one fan. Everybody got thrown out."

The flurry of ejections began in the bottom of the second inning, when Timmons called interference on Brewers runner Craig Counsell for leaving the baseline in an attempt to break up Chris Narveson's double play. Catcher Jonathan Lucroy, who initially appeared to score on the play for a 3-0 Brewers lead, was ordered back to third base while Macha rushed out to argue.

That call was crucial until the fifth inning, when McGehee's two-run single off St. Louis starter Kyle Lohse (2-7) snapped a tie and gave the Brewers a 4-2 lead. McGehee also hit an RBI double in Milwaukee's two-run first inning, and he claimed the club lead with 90 RBIs.

"We scored all our runs with two outs," Macha said. "That's what the bugaboo's been. The other team scoring two-out runs. Tonight, that was ours on all four runs."

That cushion was enough for Narveson (11-7), who matched a season-high with nine strikeouts and limited St. Louis to two runs on four hits in seven sharp innings. He didn't allow a hit until the fourth inning, when the Cardinals strung together four in a row, including RBI singles by Yadier Molina and Colby Rasmus.

Narveson watched a 1-0 lead slip away from the bullpen in the seventh inning of his previous start in Cincinnati, so this time he handled the inning himself. Narveson retired nine of the final 10 men he faced, and erased the exception -- Matt Holliday, who walked leading off the sixth inning -- on a strikeout-throwout double play.

He set down the final five Cardinals hitters he faced in order, including three strikeouts.

"I felt like I had all my pitches working and was able to execute when I needed to," Narveson said. "I kept them off-balance. The knocks that they had, they did some good pieces of hitting. It's going to happen at some point during the game."

The 33,149 fans in the stands -- or at least the 33,148 who avoided Davidson's ire -- might remember the flurry of ejections as much as McGehee's clutch hit or Narveson's mound gem.

One inning after Macha was tossed by Timmons after the call at second base, Cardinals pitching coach Duncan was ejected in the bottom of the third inning for arguing balls and strikes for Lohse, who was charged with four runs on seven hits in five innings.

Dickerson was ejected after striking out for the third time to end the fifth inning. Dickerson, who was upset in the first inning after his apparent ball four turned into a check-swing strike, took issue with Davidson's called strike 3 to end the fifth and slammed his helmet.

Two innings later, Davidson turned his attention to a male fan sitting in one of the front rows behind home plate. Davidson alerted security officials to the man, who was removed.

"It was kind of a crazy game," said left fielder Ryan Braun. "A lot of action and a lot of action early. I don't really know what was going on, but I'm happy we won and I'm thrilled for Trevor."

Jordan Schelling is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.