Tucker's baserunning mishap results in DP

Astros rookie slows up heading to second after Correa called out on strikes

Tucker's baserunning mishap results in DP

SAN FRANCISCO -- Astros rookie outfielder Preston Tucker learned a lesson in Wednesday's 2-0 win over the Giants: Never take any play for granted.

Tucker was tagged out just shy of second base after he pulled up, thinking Carlos Correa had drawn a walk on a close 3-2 pitch in the sixth inning. Tucker, who was running on the play, didn't see the umpire signal strike three because Correa had crossed in front of the plate thinking he had walked.

Giants catcher Buster Posey was the only one who seemed to know for sure what was going on, firing to second to throw out Tucker.

"Obviously, I shouldn't have shut it down," he said. "The ball looked up and away and I'm obviously looking for the umpire's reaction. I saw him step back. I thought it was a ball, and I guess as Correa is walking across the plate, that's when he ended up ringing him, and I didn't see that part.

"I don't know if [shortstop Brandon] Crawford saw it either because he asked and as soon as I saw Correa turn around, he ended up calling it for strike three. I knew I was in a little bit of trouble. I probably shouldn't have shut it down, but I didn't see the call."

The double play essentially killed the Astros' rally, and on the next pitch Jed Lowrie grounded out to quickly end what was shaping up to be a promising inning. Colby Rasmus eased the pain in the next inning, slugging a homer to give Houston a 1-0 lead.

"Ultimately, you've got to finish plays," manager A.J. Hinch said. "I think that's the lesson learned there. I think everybody played umpire a little bit. Carlos played umpire and started towards first base, Tuck played umpire and shut it down. Those are some of the mistakes we've got to clean up to be the team that we are."

Brian McTaggart is a reporter for MLB.com and writes an MLBlog, Tag's Lines. Follow @brianmctaggart on Twitter and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.