Thompson gets silent treatment after 1st HR

White Sox rookie hits solo shot off Angels' Santiago

Thompson gets silent treatment after 1st HR

CHICAGO -- Just another game. Just another home run.

That's how Trayce Thompson described his first career long ball, coming in the fifth inning of a 3-0 White Sox victory over the Angels on Tuesday night at U.S. Cellular Field. Just another home run, until the 24-year-old rookie got to the home dugout.

He received a low-five from manager Robin Ventura, but then he got the silent treatment from his teammates. That moment finally broke when Thompson, who was giving imaginary high-fives, tapped Jose Abreu on the chest and Abreu's laugher started a celebratory mosh pit.

"These guys like to have fun. It was great. It was awesome. It was funny," said Thompson. "It's something I'll remember forever, that's for sure."

Thompson's 402-foot blast to left-center came off of a 2-1 sinker from Hector Santiago and gave the White Sox a three-run lead. But in reality, this home run was far from something normal.

Santiago and Thompson became good friends while playing together in the White Sox Minor League system. Although Thompson retrieved the milestone baseball, he laughed and said there would be no request for Santiago to sign it.

Then there's the last name attached to Trayce, also shared by his father, Mychal, who won two NBA championships with the Los Angeles Lakers. And don't forget his older brothers, Mychel, who played for the Cavaliers in the NBA, and Klay, the All-Star sharp-shooter who helped Golden State to the NBA crown this past season.

On this night, Klay was better known as Trayce's brother and shared his excitement through Twitter.

"Lets goooooooooo!!! I see u trizzy!" Klay tweeted in response to the White Sox tweeting out his brother's homer.

"Two of the best sports moments of my life was watching Klay make his debut and my oldest brother making the Cavaliers," Trayce said. "It was amazing to see their accomplishments. Their support means the world to me. They're my two best friends in the world and they always will be, so it's awesome that they back me up."

Scott Merkin is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Merk's Works, follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.