Dodgers sticking with Pederson despite slump

Third baseman Turner not expected to require extended DL stint

Dodgers sticking with Pederson despite slump

PHILADELPHIA -- Manager Don Mattingly said the Dodgers have not discussed sending slumping rookie Joc Pederson back to the Minor Leagues.

"I just think right now he is what he is," said Mattingly. "He's been a guy all year long that walks, homers and strikes out -- been pretty consistent all year long."

Mattingly indicated that Pederson is contributing defensively with solid play in center field.

"I think really now is not the time to start messing with the club and getting away from playing great defense in the middle of the field," he said. "Right now we have Joc sitting in the eight-hole, where there's really no pressure. We're not asking for a lot of offense. Really, there's been no talk of anything different."

Pederson made the National League All-Star team on the strength of 20 first-half home runs. But after hitting .298 in April, his average had sunk to .223 entering Tuesday, and he's on pace for more than 200 strikeouts. He hit .169 with one home run and five RBIs in July.

Turner's DL stint should be brief

Mattingly said he expects third baseman Justin Turner to be activated after he spends the minimum 15 days on the disabled list with a skin infection on his right thigh, adding that the incision made to clean the infected area has not fully closed. Turner is going to the club's Arizona Spring Training complex so he can participate in baseball activities as soon as he receives medical clearance once the incision closes.

"As soon as he's able to do baseball stuff, it should be just a few days [before he rejoins the club]," said Mattingly, who doesn't believe Turner will require a Minor League rehab assignment.

Turner developed the infection in New York and is eligible to come off the DL on Aug. 11. In his absence, Alex Guerrero has received most of the starts at third base.

Ken Gurnick is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.