Bryant exits with dizziness, feeling 'better'

Cubs third baseman shaken up after headfirst slide into second

Bryant exits with dizziness, feeling 'better'

MILWAUKEE -- Cubs rookie Kris Bryant was removed in the fifth inning of Sunday's 4-3 win over the Brewers as a precautionary measure because he felt a little dizzy after a hard slide into second base in the fifth inning. He was to be re-examined on Monday in Pittsburgh, where the Cubs open a three-game series.

"He got banged a little bit on the slide, popped him in the head a little bit," Cubs manager Joe Maddon said. "He's a little bit dizzy at the moment. We believe he's fine. I think he's going to be fine actually."

The Cubs had runners at first and second with one out in the fifth when Bryant lofted a ball to center. A run scored on the single, and Bryant tried to extend his hit by going to second and sliding headfirst under shortstop Jean Segura. It appears Segura accidentally hit Bryant in the head.

"It was a hard play," Bryant said. "I was going as hard as I can, hustled in there. I'm feeling better and we'll see what it feels like tomorrow."

The Brewers challenged whether Bryant was safe on the slide, and after a review, the call stood. But while the umpires were looking at video, Cubs athletic trainer PJ Mainville was checking on Bryant at second. Right before play resumed, Bryant walked off the field, and Jonathan Herrera took over as a pinch-runner and then at third base defensively.

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Bryant said the play wasn't going to make him change his aggressive approach.

"I'm always going hard," he said. "I think it's a good situation to get to second, another guy in scoring position. It's not going to slow me down."

Named to the All-Star team in his rookie season, Bryant is coming off a tough July, during which he batted .168. Maddon is constantly reminding the third baseman about how he can help the Cubs win in other ways.

"Every time he makes a good baserunning play, I make sure I tell him," Maddon said. "He's one of the best baserunners in the National League right now.

"I want him to understand all these other things he's doing really, really well," Maddon said. "Big hit today obviously, but it goes beyond that. He understands playing the complete game. He does understand that and that's typical of the things he does to help you win every day."

Carrie Muskat is a reporter for MLB.com. She writes a blog, Muskat Ramblings. You can follow her on Twitter @CarrieMuskat and listen to her podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.