Phillips makes MLB history with career night

Second baseman homers twice, notches career-high seven RBIs

Phillips makes MLB history with career night

CINCINNATI -- Reds second baseman Brandon Phillips set a Major League record that had never been touched since 1920 on Thursday night -- and he didn't need the entire nine innings to do it.

Phillips went 4-for-5 to help lead the Reds to a 15-5 victory over the Pirates at Great American Ball Park on Thursday. With the incredible night, Phillips became the first player since MLB began keeping track of RBIs in 1920 to record two home runs, two stolen bases, four hits and seven RBIs in a single game, according to Elias Sports Bureau.

Phillips, Holmberg on Reds' win

"I don't really pay attention to that stuff. I was very surprised myself," said Phillips, who was replaced by Skip Schumaker before the seventh inning. "I could have sworn Willie Mays, Hank Aaron or Rickey Henderson, some of those guys probably did it. But I don't know where y'all get these stats from. Y'all probably just digging in the box trying to find something, and I'll tell you one thing: I'm glad y'all really told me, because I'm really feeling myself right now. History baby."

It was only the seventh time in Phillips' 14-year career that he hit two home runs in a game and first time since April 12, 2013. Both of Phillips' home runs were three-run shots to left field, coming in the fifth and sixth innings.

Phillips' three-run homer

Phillips was also the first Reds batter with seven RBIs in a game since Javier Valentin on June 17, 2005, against the Rockies.

Phillips has now successfully recorded hits in 17 of his past 20 games, and recently he held a nine-game hitting streak that was snapped on Tuesday against the Cardinals. Phillips struggled in St. Louis, going 1-for-11 in the three-game series, and he said it was nice to get back on track Thursday.

"I was hitting fungo to the shortstop," Phillips said. "I was getting pretty mad, but I made up for it today, so it feels good to feel yourself every once in a while."

Robert Bondy is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.