Petition started to put Killebrew on US stamp

Petition started to put Killebrew on US stamp

MINNEAPOLIS -- Harmon Killebrew has been honored with numerous accolades after his illustrious playing career -- including being inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1984 and the Minnesota Twins' Hall of Fame in 2000 -- but he could see his likeness on a U.S. postage stamp.

Killebrew, who died in 2011 after a battle with esophageal cancer, has been nominated to be featured on a commemorative postage stamp. Fans can sign the petition urging the United States Postal Service's Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee to select Killebrew. A Twitter account (@HarmonUSStamp) has also been created. The goal is to try to get 1,000 signatures on the petition.

Killebrew is widely regarded as one of the most beloved Twins players in franchise history, as his nickname on the field was "Killer," but he was known for his warm and gentle demeanor off the field. The slugger hit a franchise-record 559 homers in 21 years with the organization, including seven years with the Washington Senators before they moved to Minnesota in 1961.

The petition states: "Harmon was revered on and off the field as a true gentleman and ambassador of the game. His sportsmanship and athletic prowess embodied the greatest elements of baseball and the American story, rising from humble roots to inspire generations of fans and ball players alike.

"Harmon passed away in 2011, leaving behind a legacy of power hitting, civic engagement and humility that continues to serve as the gold standard for athlete role models today. His fans stretch far beyond Minnesota, his native Idaho, his adopted Arizona and Washington, DC, where his baseball career began. As an inspiring icon of our country's most iconic sport, I believe that Harmon Killebrew deserves to be commemorated with an U.S. Postal stamp."

Rhett Bollinger is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Bollinger Beat, follow him on Twitter @RhettBollinger and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.