Pence's slam leads Giants' rout of Phillies

Pence's slam leads Giants' rout of Phillies

SAN FRANCISCO -- Hunter Pence's grand slam Friday night helped the San Francisco Giants propel Cole Hamels to one of the worst defeats of his career as the reigning World Series champions routed the Philadelphia Phillies, 15-2.

The Giants, who broke their AT&T Park record with 22 hits and set a season high in runs, established a 2015 best with eight runs in the fourth inning, as seven consecutive batters reached base with one out before Pence launched a 1-1 fastball onto the right-field arcade.

"It was time for us to break out at some point," said manager Bruce Bochy, whose Giants scored 13 runs in their previous seven games and had 22 hits in the preceding four games. "It looked like the day off [Thursday] helped the guys."

Giants' eight-run frame

Pence's fifth career grand slam finished Hamels (5-7), whose 3 1/3-inning outing was his shortest since a 2 2/3-inning stint against the Mets on April 5, 2011.

"The moment it left my hands, I knew it wasn't going to be something good," Hamels said of Pence's homer. "With the strength that he has, you know exactly what the writing on the wall was."

Hamels surrendered a career-worst nine runs, and the 12 hits he allowed matched his highest total since May 31, 2013, against Milwaukee.

"We all know he's much better than that," interim manager Pete Mackanin said. "I can't remember a time when I've seen him pitch like that."

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Pagan produces: Amid all the Giants' fourth-inning offense, it might have been easy to forget that Angel Pagan provided the first two runs with a bases-loaded single. Pagan thus recorded his first multiple-RBI game since Opening Night, April 6 at Arizona. He also scored a season-high three runs and collected three hits for the first time since May 12 against Houston. More >

Pagan's two-run single

Ruiz ends drought: The Phillies entered Friday having not scored a run in 20 straight innings, their second longest such streak of the season. After coming up empty in the first three innings against Bumgarner, Carlos Ruiz took a first-pitch slider from the lefty and deposited it into the left-field seats to tie the game. The catcher finished a triple short of the cycle and scored both Philadelphia runs.

Ruiz's solo homer

Bumgarner prevails: Since he last faced Philadelphia on June 6, Bumgarner had lost three of four decisions in a five-start stretch, despite allowing two runs or fewer in four of those games. This time, the Giants' offense benefited instead of betrayed him. And the lopsided margin gave manager Bruce Bochy the freedom to remove his ace after 5 2/3 innings.

MadBum does it all in win

"If there's any time I can save some bullets with him, I'm going to do it," Bochy said.

SOUND SMART WITH YOUR FRIENDS
The Giants' 22-hit total was their highest in a nine-inning home game -- encompassing their tenure in Seals Stadium and Candlestick Park as well as AT&T Park -- since the franchise moved to San Francisco in 1958.

REPLAY REVIEW
The Giants claimed Pence was hit by a third-inning Hamels pitch, which eluded Ruiz and caromed off the backstop. A video review determined the call on the field that Pence was not hit stands.

Call stands on wild pitch

WHAT'S NEXT
Phillies: David Buchanan returns from Triple-A Lehigh Valley to make his sixth start of the season Saturday. Buchanan has not pitched well on the road this year, allowing 15 runs and 23 hits in 15 innings away from Citizens Bank Park.

Giants: Ryan Vogelsong, who opposes Philadelphia on Saturday at 7:05 p.m. PT, expects to stick around longer than he did at Washington last Sunday. That night, Vogelsong received his first career ejection in the fifth inning just as he was hitting his stride, having allowed one run in four innings.

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Chris Haft is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Haft-Baked Ideas, follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast. Oliver Macklin is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.