Scribner looking to shake rough stretch

Right-handed reliever allows two home runs in loss to Mariners

Scribner looking to shake rough stretch

OAKLAND -- Back in May, Evan Scribner was a reliable setup man for the A's and at one point owned a 1.10 ERA. Now his ERA lies at 3.64, as he's allowed 15 earned runs in 25 2/3 innings since May 8.

Scribner's most recent struggles came in a 9-5 loss to the Mariners at the Coliseum on Friday. He gave up four runs (three earned) in two innings, surrendering two-run homers to both Nelson Cruz and Brad Miller in a rocky eighth inning.

The A's bullpen has been inconsistent all season. Friday was the latest example, with Scribner as the main source of the problem.

Melvin on Athletics' 9-5 loss

He has now been roughed for the most home runs in the Majors out of all relievers this season at nine.

"It's very frustrating, obviously," Scribner said. "To be from going so good to struggling again like this, it's just the life of a reliever."

Interestingly, 22 of Scribner's 26 pitches were strikes, but he lost an 0-2 cutter to Cruz and hung a curveball to Miller.

After starter Jesse Chavez gave up a pair of two-run bombs of his own, Scribner's difficulties helped the Mariners pull away.

"He has the ability to pitch very well for us," A's manager Bob Melvin said. "He's just going through a tough time."

Scribner said he can't pinpoint the root of the problem.

"If I could, I would try to fix it," he said.

Scribner said he first started struggling against the Angels on June 19 when he gave up two home runs. He's yielded four more home runs since then.

He said he lost his fastball location for about a week starting in Anaheim, and then he tried to overcompensate with off-speed pitches, but opposing hitters adjusted and outsmarted him.

Scribner has also struggled mightily against the Mariners in particular, giving up five earned runs in 4 2/3 innings against them this season.

"Just a couple bad pitches, I guess," he said. "Facing these guys, they probably know what I've got and have an idea what they want to do against me."

Trevor Hass is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.