In debut, Marrero makes sparkling play

Playing second base, Red Sox's No. 9 prospect saves run in tight game with diving stop

In debut, Marrero makes sparkling play

ST. PETERSBURG -- For days, Deven Marrero sat on the Red Sox's bench, eagerly awaiting the moment he got to step onto the diamond.

The rookie infielder was selected to Boston's roster Thursday to add infield depth after Dustin Pedroia landed on the disabled list, but had yet to make his Major League debut. That was until Mike Napoli was ejected during the Red Sox's 5-3 victory over the Rays on Sunday.

In Napoli's absence, Brock Holt slid over from second base to first base and Marrero trotted on the field for the first time to man second.

"It was awesome," said Marrero, the No. 9 Red Sox prospect according to MLB.com. "It was a lot of fun to go in there and grind through that game and try and help the squad."

At the plate, Marrero struck out twice in his two at-bats, but in the eighth, he certainly did his part to aid in Boston's series-clinching victory.

With two away and Logan Forsythe on second, Brandon Guyer shot a ground ball to the right side of the infield that seemed destined for right field, but Marrero ranged to his right, made a diving stop and got the speedy Guyer at first to end the inning and preserve the two-run lead.

"I just try to stay ready every pitch," Marrero said. "He made a good swing and the guy was definitely going to score, so I just laid out to give my relief pitcher a chance and it worked out."

The play is one that Red Sox starter Justin Masterson, who tossed five innings of one-run ball en route to a victory in his return to the rotation, got accustomed to seeing from Marrero during the righty's rehab stint at Triple-A Pawtucket.

"That's why he is here," Masterson said. "He probably didn't hit as well as he would've liked, but that play, that's who he is. I remember when I went down [to Triple-A], he made a play on a ball that I thought was going to be a hit, then he got to it and I thought it would only be one out, and then we turn the double play, and that's what he brings to the table.

"He's a smart guy and he's going to do some great things."

Troy Provost-Heron is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.