No. 2 prospect Judge headed to Triple-A

No. 2 prospect Judge headed to Triple-A

NEW YORK -- Aaron Judge's powerful bat left a lasting impression on the Yankees during Spring Training. Now, after tearing though opposing pitching at Double-A, Judge appears to be moving his way up the team's Minor League system.

The Yankees will reportedly promote Judge -- the team's No. 2 prospect, and No. 57 in all of baseball, as rated by MLB.com -- to Triple-A Scranton, according to Jack Curry of YES Network.

Judge began the season in Double-A, the first time he had ever played above Class A Advanced, and in 62 games he owned a slash line of .289/.335/.524 with 12 homers and 44 RBIs. With the recent rash of promotions for the game's best prospects, he is one of the top power hitters remaining in the Minor Leagues.

The Yankees selected Judge with the 32nd pick over all in the 2013 Draft. He clubbed 17 home runs in his first professional season in 2014, earning him an invite to big league camp this past spring. Then in his Grapefruit League debut, Judge belted a game-tying three-run homer with two outs in the ninth inning in the Yankees' 5-5 tie with the Phillies on March 3.

Judge's game-tying homer

It is possible that if Judge, 23, continues to hit at this pace, he could find himself in the Bronx at some point this season. At 6-foot-7, 255 pounds, he projects as a future power-hitting corner outfielder in the Majors. Judge won the Home Run Derby at the 2012 College World Series and has drawn comparisons to a former power-hitting Yankees outfielder, Dave Winfield.

"He's just big. He's just big and strong," Yankees manager Joe Girardi said this spring. "You're not going to see too many people that big in the game. It's just not tall -- there's a lot of strength there as well. He's a really good athlete, and sometimes when you see a guy like that, you're not sure how good of an athlete you have. But you have a really good athlete, too."

Jamal Collier is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @jamalcollier. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.