'Wheels come off' for Young in fifth

With Royals trailing by two, righty allows five runs

'Wheels come off' for Young in fifth

KANSAS CITY -- Right-hander Chris Young knew he wasn't on top of his game early on. But he was just hoping he could persevere and keep his team close through five or six innings.

Cast your Esurance All-Star ballot for #ASGWorthy players

Young almost made it, but his command fell apart in a rough five-run fifth inning that led to his worst outing of the season. The Royals wound up losing, 13-2, to the Red Sox on Sunday.

"He just didn't have his fastball command today," Royals manager Ned Yost said. "One of those days."

Said Young, "It wasn't horrible until the fifth. That's when I lost it. I just couldn't execute and they're a hot-hitting club right now. It's a good offensive team. I just fell behind too much in the fifth."

Young gave up seven hits and seven runs through 4 2/3 innings. But until the fifth, he had given up just solo homers to David Ortiz and Hanley Ramirez and the Royals were within range at 2-0.

Hanley's solo shot

"Chances are, two solo homers aren't going to beat you," Young said. "But in the fifth, the wheels came off."

In the fifth, Young walked the No. 9 hitter, Sandy Leon, and then red-hot Mookie Betts smoked a home run to left.

Later, Young gave up two doubles sandwiched around two more walks.

"They're hot," Young said. "I might have been trying to be too fine. But they're a good team with a good lineup and they're hot. It's really when you catch a team and they're swinging the bats well right now.

"Over the course of the season you're going to have a few of [these games]. It's not enjoyable. You expect to be your best each time out, but that's not going to be the case."

The Royals had a winning homestand, taking three of five. But they lost this series, two games to one.

"I need to be better and give my team a chance," Young said. "It's disappointing."

Jeffrey Flanagan is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @FlannyMLB. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.