Dad's guidance a steady force for Correa

Amid two-job schedule, rookie's father introduced rising star to game at age 5

Dad's guidance a steady force for Correa

HOUSTON -- Carlos Correa's father would do everything he could to help his son become a Major League player. It was Correa's father who first introduced the Astros' rookie shortstop to the game when he was 5 years old in Puerto Rico, and his father, also named Carlos Correa, remains a huge influence to this day.

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Correa, a 20-year-old budding star, made his Major League debut last week, three years after being taken with the No. 1 overall pick in the Draft. Correa's father, mother, brother and sister were in Chicago when he made his debut on June 8 and rejoiced with him a day later, when he clubbed his first career homer at U.S. Cellular Field.

"It was great," said Correa, who gave the ball to his dad after the game. "I get to hit my first home run and him being out there. It was a great accomplishment for me and my family. They were really excited about that momentum, and that's something I wanted to share with them so they can keep it for the rest of their life."

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Correa -- the No. 2 prospect in the game, according to MLB.com -- said his father wasn't a baseball player but would watch games on television to try to teach his son how to play the game. His dad also took a second job working construction so his son could learn English, and he always made time to show his son the finer points of the game.

"He didn't know much about baseball and then he started looking for people that knew about baseball and more information about baseball, and he started teaching me," Correa said. "We were out there at the ballpark every single day trying out new stuff when I was a kid, and then I got on baseball teams and I started learning to play the right way. I had the talent, and I was able to develop and become a good player."

Correa's father can't help but boast about his son.

"He's been working all his life, basically -- since he was 5 years old -- to be here, and all the hard work has paid off," the elder Correa said.

Now that he has settled into life as a Major Leaguer, the young Correa still turns to his father for advice.

"We talk every single day about hitting after the game," Correa said. "Now, I'm here in the big leagues and he's still here telling me stuff about hitting and what I should do. It's fun. He's my dad, and we have fun doing it. He just lets me play. He's always there talking baseball, just like my best friend."

Brian McTaggart is a reporter for MLB.com and writes an MLBlog, Tag's Lines. Follow @brianmctaggart on Twitter and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.