Pirates' scoreless mound streak ends at 35 IP

Stretch ranks fourth in franchise history; Cervelli's mark stops at 56

Pirates' scoreless mound streak ends at 35 IP

In the sixth inning of Wednesday night's Pirates-White Sox game at U.S. Cellular Field, Jeff Locke gave up a double to Melky Cabrera, Adam Eaton raced across home plate and the 1903 Pirates' spot in history remained secure.

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Eaton's run ended the Bucs staff's remarkable 35-inning scoreless streak, and spoiled the club's chances of securing its sixth shutout over a seven-game span. Pittsburgh would eventually secure a 3-2 victory for its seventh straight win.

In that regard, Pittsburgh's 1903 club stands alone. The starting staff led by Deacon Phillippe, Sam Leever, Ed Doheny and Brickyard Kennedy can keep its spot atop several notable lists.

The 2015 run of 35 zeros ranks fourth in franchise history, trailing only the 1903 (51 innings), 1931 (45) and 1972 (36) clubs.

The 1903 Pirates still own the longest scoreless streak in Major League history, having tossed 51 consecutive shutout innings. They are also the only team in big league history to throw six shutouts in a seven-game stretch. In fact, they blanked the opposition for six straight games from June 2-8.

Managed by Fred Clarke, that club went on to finish 91-49, the best record in the National League. They played in Exposition Park and lost the World Series, in eight games, to the Boston Americans.

That rotation was led by Phillippe, who went 25-9 with a 2.43 ERA in 289 1/3 innings, and Leever, who matched Phillippe's 25 wins while posting a 2.06 ERA over 284 1/3 innings.

Hall of Famer Honus Wagner was the team's star player, batting .355 with five home runs, 101 RBIs and 46 stolen bases in 129 games.

At least one 2015 Pirate managed to match the glory of the 1903 squad, however: Francisco Cervelli tied Ed Phelps for the longest streak of consecutive scoreless innings by a Pirates catcher with 56.

Adam Berry is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @adamdberry. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.