Myers anticipates wrist surgery in offseason

Padres OF/1B says DL stint alleviated discomfort caused by bone spur

Myers anticipates wrist surgery in offseason

SAN DIEGO -- Padres center fielder/first baseman Wil Myers said there's a "high possibility" he'll have offseason surgery to remove a bone spur from his left wrist.

Myers, who returned from the disabled list Thursday, has dealt with the effects of the bone spur for most of his life. It's what caused the left-wrist tendinitis that sidelined him for a month.

"It's a high possibility, but not during the year," Myers said about surgery. "It's a simple fix, but I can't do it now because of the rehab during the season. I want to be out there."

Myers also jammed the wrist last season, but decided to play through the injury -- which he admits led to his .222 batting average in 2014. His time on the DL this season, has eliminated all the aggravation in the area.

As a precaution, however, Myers has the wrist taped, and will continue to do so as long as he feels is necessary. Before every at-bat, Myers changes that tape to make sure it's as tight as it needs to be.

"Right now, it's just more of a confidence thing," Myers said. "It's still in the back of my mind what it felt like a month ago. But with that tape, it gives me the confidence to know that I won't feel that, regardless."

Myers started at first base Friday night for the Padres' series opener vs. the Dodgers. He also played first base in three games in May with Yonder Alonso on the disabled list.

His return to the lineup gives the Padres an instant boost in more ways than one. First and foremost, he offers much-needed production at the top of the order. Even with Thursday's 0-for-5, Myers is hitting .281/.333/.475 with an OPS+ of 128.

But, along with the production, he also gives the Padres some flexibility. Facing a tough lefty (like Kershaw on Friday), Black has the option of giving Alonso a day off, while playing Myers at first.

As for Myers' transition to first base, Black said that's never been an issue, given Myers' penchant for being active. Black even kidded that Myers might get bored without the extra work at first, saying, "In all honesty, I think he sort of needs the stimulation."

"He just likes to play," Black said. "You watch him play pingpong, you watch him shoot baskets, you watch him do stuff -- he likes to play. He's a kid. When you tell him to play first base, like most kids [he says], 'Hey, I'm in.'"

Myers, who spent plenty of time working on his defense at first base during his time on the disabled list, agreed with Black's assessment.

"I like playing both," Myers said. "It never gets boring."

AJ Cassavell is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.