Off DL, Dickerson collects 2 of Rockies' 5 hits

Off DL, Dickerson collects 2 of Rockies' 5 hits

MIAMI -- When Corey Dickerson stepped onto the field Thursday night against the Marlins, it felt a bit like Opening Day.

"I think I'll be kind of excited for the first couple at-bats to get back into it, but after that first game, it's back to normal," Dickerson said before the Rockies fell, 6-0. "It's like you played every day."

Colorado reinstated Dickerson, on the 15-day disabled list with plantar fasciitis, for Thursday's series opener at Marlins Park. He started in left field and batted sixth. The Rockies optioned Kyle Parker to Triple-A Albuquerque as the corresponding roster move.

Dickerson went 2-for-4 with a double to left-center in the seventh and a two-strike single to left in the ninth.

Prior to landing on the DL on May 19, Dickerson posted a .306 average with five doubles, two triples, five homers and 16 RBIs in 33 games.

"I hit him there a lot before he got hurt," manager Walt Weiss said of the outfielder batting sixth. "He's a guy who's going to hop around in our lineup. He's a good hitter, he can get on base, he can drive in runs, got some pop in the bat, so he can be slotted a few different spots in the lineup. Got him six. What it does is it lengthens our lineup, makes it a more dangerous lineup, too."

Rather than appear in any rehab games with the Isotopes, Dickerson got 13 at-bats over two days in extended spring training.

In his first appearance, Dickerson hit third and played defense for five innings. After that, he worked out and got treatment. The next day, he went the full nine frames and recorded seven plate appearances. While on the DL, Dickerson stayed sharp by following his daily routine, even taking an extra round or two of batting practice a few times.

Asked whether he tested his foot enough running the bases and manning the outfield, Dickerson said he believed so. He continues to wear a boot to sleep and visits the training room earlier than he used to.

"Obviously we'll check in with him regularly to see how he's feeling every day, but I plan on picking my spots to get him off his feet here and there," Weiss said.

Christina De Nicola is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.