MLB.com Columnist

Roger Schlueter

Stats of the Day: Blue Jays let the homers fly

Toronto goes deep four times vs. Marlins; leads baseball in long balls since '10

Stats of the Day: Blue Jays let the homers fly

Here are five interesting items from around the big leagues on Wednesday:

• The Blue Jays banged out four home runs as part of their 7-2 victory over the Marlins at Rogers Centre. Toronto has won eight straight and is averaging 7.1 runs per game during the streak. The Blue Jays have a team slash line of .299/.361/.522 during the eight-game run, basically hitting like a team of Troy Tulowitzki clones. Since the start of the 2010 season, the Blue Jays rank first in the Majors in home runs at home (590), and they rank second in homers hit on the road (488). Overall, their 1,078 roundtrippers for this stretch are the most. The Yankees, with 1,035, rank second over that period.

• Batting leadoff for the Astros, George Springer went 5-for-5 but didn't score a run. Springer is one of 31 leadoff hitters since 1914 to have a five-hit, no-run game, and the second one to do it this season, joining Dee Gordon (April 18). Before this year, it hadn't been done since 2009 (when Adam Kennedy managed to pull off this feat twice). Springer is the first Astro to do this since Bill Doran on July 11, 1985. Springer also stole a base in the game, making him one of six players since 1914 to have a five-hit, one-steal, no-run line out of the leadoff spot. The others: Jake Wood ('61), Joe Morgan ('82), Vince Coleman (in '88 and '95) and Roger Cedeno (2001).

Springer's five-hit game

• The Cardinals defeated the Rockies, 4-2, marking the 33rd time through their 60 games this season in which they allowed two runs or fewer. Those 33 through 60 games represent the most for any National League team since the 1963 Cubs also did it in 33 of their first 60.

• The Rays defeated the Angels, 4-2, giving Tampa Bay its 30th game of allowing two runs or fewer in 60 games. Those 30 through 60 contests are the most for any American League club since 1972, when the Orioles had 36 and the Athletics and Tigers each had 32. The next year saw the first year of the designated hitter in the Junior Circuit.

• In a D-backs' 7-6 loss to the Dodgers, Paul Goldschmidt produced the 100th home run of his career. Goldschmidt is one of 28 players in history to have, through his first five seasons, at least 100 homers and at least 75 percent of his games played at first base. Among this group, his 152 OPS+ is the sixth highest, trailing the marks from Frank Thomas (184), Johnny Mize (174), Norm Cash (157), Fred McGriff (153) and Jeff Bagwell (153).

Goldschmidt's big night

Milestone watch for June 11

Tim Lincecum stands seven strikeouts shy of reaching 1,700 for his career. When he gets the seven, he will become the 20th pitcher to reach that number through his first nine seasons.

Curtis Granderson has 31 leadoff homers in his career. His next one will move him out of a tie with Chuck Knoblauch and Ian Kinsler and into sole possession of 11th most in history.

Roger Schlueter is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.