Urena's 'tremendous' outing wows Jennings

Urena's 'tremendous' outing wows Jennings

DENVER -- When describing Jose Urena's Sunday outing versus the Rockies, Marlins manager Dan Jennings had a favorite word -- tremendous.

Jennings used it five times in his postgame interview and for good reason. In just his third Major League start, Urena twirled six efficient innings, propelling the Marlins to a 3-2 series-clinching victory in 10 innings over Colorado at Coors Field.

"The more I get on the mound, I'm a lot more confident in working the corners of the plate," Urena said through an interpreter. "I try not to make mistakes up in the zone because I know they can hit the ball up."

In total, Urena scattered just three hits and one run, while striking out four and walking two on 82 pitches. The Rockies mustered just two runners into scoring position against the rookie right-hander -- both coming in the fourth inning when Colorado loaded the bases with one out.

But all Urena gave up was a sacrifice fly to Nolan Arenado before retiring Wilin Rosario on a groundout, keeping the damage at a minimum.

"Tremendous, tremendous outing with quality pitches," Jennings said. "He put us in a position to win."

Urena starts nice double play

Urena was originally promoted on April 13, but made just two relief appearances before being sent back down to Triple-A New Orleans. He then made five starts with the Zephyrs -- he was 3-0 with a 1.15 ERA over 31 1/3 innings -- and was called back up on May 26.

He immediately joined the Miami rotation but struggled in his first two Major League starts, producing a 6.75 ERA and a .318 opponent's batting average.

"Minor leagues and the big leagues are definitely not the same," Urena said. "Sometimes you come up with pressure within yourself, but you've just got to go out and focus and try to do what you can do."

Sunday, however, was more like the old Urena, and the Marlins hope there are more "tremendous" outings to follow.

Dargan Southard is an associate reporter for MLB.com.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.