Oberholtzer derailed by 3-run frame in Toronto

Gonzalez's error adds to difficulties in crucial inning for Astros starter

Oberholtzer derailed by 3-run frame in Toronto

TORONTO -- Like Roberto Hernandez before him, a big inning sunk Brett Oberholtzer's outing against the Blue Jays on Saturday.

Oberholtzer allowed three runs (two earned) in the second inning as the Blue Jays topped the Astros, 7-2, at Rogers Centre. It was the second time in as many days a big Toronto inning haunted the Astros. Hernandez was hit around for a five-run third in Houston's series opening loss Friday.

"When you start in that hole, it's tough to get back the momentum and rhythm you want," Astros manager A.J. Hinch said.

Oberholtzer was saddled with the loss after lasting only 3 2/3 innings, allowing four runs while matching a career-high-tying three walks as his record fell to 0-1 on the season.

Making his second start since being activated from the disabled list following a nagging blister injury, Oberholtzer got into trouble early and never recovered. After allowing a run in the first, the Blue Jays knocked around the Astros starter in the second while capitalizing on some shoddy defense.

Marwin Gonzalez couldn't make the play on what should've been a Dioner Navarro groundout with one on and nobody out. Shortstop Jonathan Villar knocked down Navarro's shot up the middle and fired to first in time get the Blue Jays catcher as he barreled down the baseline. But Gonzalez, playing first in place of Chris Carter for the 11th time in his career, couldn't find the bag with his foot and was charged with an error as Navarro reached base.

Reyes' run-scoring single

That started what seemed like a never-ending inning for Oberholtzer, which included seeing all nine Blue Jays hitters come to the plate.

"I looked up and kept seeing no outs and one out, batter after batter," he said.

Oberholtzer was lifted in the fourth, marking the second time in three starts that he's been unable to pitching beyond that inning.

"I knew I wasn't going to be perfect, but I'd like to get deeper in the game than I did," said Oberholtzer.

Jamie Ross is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.