Twins' offense firing on all cylinders

Twins' offense firing on all cylinders

MINNEAPOLIS -- A thicker-than-normal layer of fog enveloped the Twins' clubhouse Wednesday, evidence of the team's 6-4 victory over the Red Sox.

The victory, which clinched a sweep for the Twins, moved the team into a tie for first place in the American League Central for the first time since winning the division in 2010.

And all this winning has taught Torii Hunter something about his teammates: Dancing isn't their forte.

"We had a lot of guys dancing. I've figured out a lot of guys can't dance," Hunter said.

After four down years, the Twins seem to be having a lot of fun, nearing June at 10 games over .500 at 28-18.

The sweep over the Red Sox was the team's first in Minnesota since 2006, a cause for the extra celebration.

"You're talking about a good team over there, the Red Sox. We got a chance to sweep one of the best teams on paper in baseball," Hunter said. "I definitely think that we're doing something right and we deserve to have a little fun in here."

The Twins haven't found themselves behind much lately, but they quickly bounced back from a two-run deficit Wednesday, picking up starter Phil Hughes by using contributions from a variety of different players.

Seven of nine batters had a hit in the game. The two that didn't -- Brian Dozier and Trevor Plouffe -- have been two of the Twins' top producers all season.

"Everybody is rowing that boat together, man," Hunter said. "When all cylinders are clicking, things are well."

Hicks' two-run homer

Center fielder Aaron Hicks and left fielder Eddie Rosario, two unlikely sources of power, hit their first and second home runs of the season, respectively.

"That's why you have nine guys in the lineup. Not everybody's going to be on every day," Hughes said. "For Hicks and Rosario to come up with big home runs there was certainly a lift for us on a day when maybe the usual suspects don't come up with that big hit."

And just like the offense, the bullpen also picked up Hughes after he surrendered a pair of two-run home runs to Dustin Pedroia and was pulled after 6 2/3 innings.

Perkins shuts the door

Five different relievers came in, with closer Glen Perkins securing his Major League-leading 18th save of the season in an easy 1-2-3 ninth.

"It's nice when everybody's pitching in and picking up the starting pitchers on days when they maybe don't have their best start," Hughes said. "Everything's just kind of clicking at the right time."

And all that "clicking" has led the Twins to an 18-6 month of May and tied at the top of the division.

"The only day the standings really matter is the last day of the season," Twins manager Paul Molitor said. "We all know that so it's about perspective, but we're pitching well, offense has been rolling, defense is coming around. There's a lot of things to be optimistic about."

Betsy Helfand is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.