Foot feeling better, McCann goes deep

Despite leaving Sunday night's game with cramps, backstop homers in first inning Monday

Foot feeling better, McCann goes deep

NEW YORK -- Though little has gone right for the Yankees over the past two weeks, the club seems to have caught a break with its latest injury scare. Brian McCann was back in the Yankees' lineup on Monday, after exiting Sunday night's 5-2 loss to the Rangers due to cramping in his right foot and calf.

Batting fifth and playing catcher, it didn't look as if McCann missed a step, as his booming three-run homer contributed to New York's eight-run first inning.

"It went away a little bit after the game, and that was it," said McCann, who had downplayed the whole situation from the beginning.

Manager Joe Girardi was a bit less optimistic immediately following the game, expressing some concern that the cramping had moved from his foot up into his calf. Needless to say, the Yankees' skipper was relieved to hear the discomfort had subsided before McCann left the ballpark, and that it didn't return.

"It turned out to just be cramps," Girardi said. "I was a little bit concerned about it last night, but even an hour after the game, he was OK. So I came in today and checked with him, and he expected to play today, and I put him in there."

The news on McCann is important considering New York is already without Jacoby Ellsbury (disabled list, right knee sprain), while fellow outfielder Carlos Beltran remained out of Monday's starting lineup with flu-like symptoms. Beltran could be available to pinch-hit if he's feeling better than he was on Sunday, but Girardi wouldn't commit one way or the other until checking in with him.

The 38-year-old Beltran has a 13-game hitting streak, during which he's hitting .320 (16-for-50) with four doubles, three home runs and nine RBIs. The streak has raised his season average from .187 to .234.

Paul Casella is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.