Miggy fifth-youngest to reach 1,400 RBIs

Miggy fifth-youngest to reach 1,400 RBIs

DETROIT -- Miguel Cabrera became the 76th player in Major League history, and the second Venezuelan-born Major Leaguer, to 1,400 career RBIs when he singled home Andrew Romine on Thursday afternoon against the Astros at Comerica Park.

Cabrera, who joined the 400-homer club last Saturday and passed Andres Galarraga for the most home runs by a Venezuelan player, joined Galarraga in the 1,400-RBI group. At 32 years and 33 days, he's also the fifth-youngest player to reach the mark.

Cabrera didn't drive in a run in three games against the Brewers earlier this week, partly because there were so few runners on base for his three hits in the series. He came up just twice with runners in scoring position, and was intentionally walked once. But he had a golden opportunity in the fifth inning Thursday with runners at first and third and one out against Astros starter Scott Feldman.

Youngest players to reach 1,400 RBIs
Player Year Age
Jimmie Foxx 1938 30 yrs., 225 days
Lou Gehrig 1934 31 yrs., 44 days
Mel Ott 1940 31 yrs., 71 days
Alex Rodriguez 2007 31 yrs., 315 days
Miguel Cabrera 2015 32 yrs., 33 days
Albert Pujols 2012 32 yrs., 198 days
Hank Aaron 1966 32 yrs., 198 days
Al Simmons 1935 32 yrs., 340 days
Manny Ramirez 2005 33 yrs., 116 days
Willie Mays 1965 34 yrs., 147 days
Source: STATS
 

Cabrera reached for a 1-2 pitch below his knees and lined it over shortstop Jonathan Villar into left field.

Cabrera has driven in over 100 runs in each of his 11 full Major League seasons. He led the American League with 126 RBIs in 2010 and 139 RBIs in his Triple Crown season of 2012. He has driven in 877 runs with the Tigers, good for 13th on the club's all-time list. Willie Horton stands 12th with 886, while Ty Cobb is the all-time leader with 1,800.

Galarraga holds the Venezuelan-born record with 1,425 career RBIs.

Jason Beck is a reporter for MLB.com. Read Beck's Blog, follow him on Twitter @beckjason and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.