A-Rod tours Capitol Hill before finale in DC

Yankees slugger visits halls of Congress, meets politicians and poses for photographs

A-Rod tours Capitol Hill before finale in DC

WASHINGTON -- As the Yankees completed their three-city, nine-game road trip, Alex Rodriguez took advantage of a rare Interleague stop in the nation's capital to do some sightseeing.

The Yankees' slugger toured the halls of Congress before Wednesday's 3-2 loss to the Nationals, shaking hands with politicians and posing for photographs, some of which quickly circulated on social media.

"I was fortunate to get an offer. How can you turn that down?" Rodriguez said. "It was a fun day. Just like any American, it was great to see Capitol Hill and to see where all the laws were made. It was a privilege."

According to The Hill, Rodriguez took his tour from the viewing gallery instead of the floor, seemingly to avoid the general crowd of visitors. Rodriguez said that it was "quite a thrill" to meet with the band of Washington power players, which included House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.).

"I thought the Speaker's balcony was pretty cool. That was amazing," Rodriguez said. "I've never been. It was pretty special. I know my daughters are going to be very jealous when I see them tomorrow. I can't wait to take them back there."

Rodriguez also visited the Georgetown University campus during the Yanks' brief stay in D.C.

"It was amazing. It was really amazing," Rodriguez said. "I had a good time."

Rodriguez's playing time was limited in the series due to the absence of the DH rule, but he batted twice in the ninth innings, striking out both times. The Yanks did not believe that Drew Storen's game-ending pitch on Wednesday was a strike, even though it was called as such by home-plate umpire Marvin Hudson.

Storen shuts the door

"I mean, I didn't think it was a strike, but I'm not the ump," Rodriguez said.

Bryan Hoch is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch, on Facebook and read his MLBlog, Bombers Beat. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.