Homers continue to plague Padres pitchers

Staff allows six long balls in tough loss

Homers continue to plague Padres pitchers

SEATTLE -- Off the top of his head, Padres manager Bud Black couldn't tell you with any certainty what has gone wrong each and every time an opposing batter has connected for a home run this season.

But Black is sure of one thing: He's tired of seeing the other team circle the bases.

"We've got to do a better job of making pitches," Black said.

That didn't happen nearly enough in the Padres' 11-4 loss to the Mariners on Tuesday at Safeco Field. The Padres allowed six home runs, the first time since 2004 a team has hit six home runs in a game in this ballpark, one that has long favored pitchers.

San Diego starting pitcher Ian Kennedy allowed two of those home runs, including a three-run shot to Kyle Seager that came as part of a four-run first inning. Reliever Shawn Kelley allowed one home run and Frank Garces allowed three more.

Seager's three-run blast

The Padres have allowed the most home runs (50) in the big leagues, just ahead of the Brewers (49).

"I didn't know that," Kennedy said, when told of this dubious statistic. "I knew we've given up quite a few homers. You don't expect that, especially with [Andrew Cashner and Tyson Ross] and our pitching staff.

"But it will even out. It's still early. We're still trying to figure it out."

San Diego starting pitchers have allowed 34 of the home runs. The relievers have been especially hit hard, as they allowed 33 home runs all of last season. Now, they're nearly halfway to that mark on May 12.

Black was asked if there's anything in particular he's seeing from his vantage point as to why foes are connecting for home runs at an alarming rate.

"I think, overall, we've been in too many bad counts and too many fastballs and breaking balls left out over the plate. Right now, overall, the first month and a half here, too many pitches not executed. We've got to do a better job of making pitches," Black said.

Corey Brock is a reporter for MLB.com. Keep track of @FollowThePadres on Twitter and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.