Vogelsong 'unsung hero' in win over Marlins

Giants starter allows one run in seven innings for second straight strong outing

Vogelsong 'unsung hero' in win over Marlins

SAN FRANCISCO -- Sunday ended with Matt Duffy's walk-off single to clinch the Giants' 3-2 win over the Marlins at AT&T Park. But it began with a strong start from San Francisco right-hander Ryan Vogelsong.

The veteran turned in his second straight quality performance, limiting the Marlins to one run over seven innings of work.

"He's kind of the unsung hero through all of this," Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. "Seven solid innings. Really, great job by Vogey. Just carried over how he threw his last start. Had a really good breaking ball, I thought today. Used his fastball well in and out. He kept us in the game because we couldn't figure out [Miami starter Mat] Latos."

As Bochy noted, the contest was a tightly contested pitchers' duel throughout. But the only run charged to Vogelsong came in the fourth inning, when he allowed an RBI ground-rule double to former teammate Michael Morse. Vogelsong didn't walk a batter for the first time in seven appearances (five starts) this year, allowing four hits while striking out five, and retired the last 10 batters he faced.

In his previous start, Vogelsong held the Padres scoreless for seven innings. His ERA has dropped to 5.67 from 9.31 following his April 29 outing.

"It's a little bit easier to relax this week coming off a good one," Vogelsong said. "Still, it's a work in progress. Definitely not going to let my guard down for sure."

So what's been the difference for Vogelsong the past two starts? He said he's been trying to keep his arm up to create a better angle and more deception. It's also led to a much improved curveball, which was on display Sunday.

"I changed some things up before the last one and I think that's really helped me stay in the strike zone," Vogelsong said. "Just going to try to ride out that as long as I can."

Alex Espinoza is a contributor to MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.