Segura feels 'pretty good' after HBP to head

Segura feels 'pretty good' after HBP to head

CHICAGO -- Brewers shortstop Jean Segura was feeling "pretty good" Sunday after being struck in the head by a 95 mph fastball, manager Ron Roenicke said. But, Segura stayed behind for further testing while the rest of the team bussed back to Milwaukee.

Athletic trainers from the Brewers and Cubs rushed to Segura's side after a Pedro Strop fastball sailed high and tight with Segura squared to bunt. Segura was struck just above the brim of his helmet, and lay motionless in the dirt near home plate for two minutes before getting to his feet and walking to first base.

It appeared for a moment that Segura would remain in the game, but he was instead helped to the dugout by Brewers first-base coach Mike Guerrero after complaining of nausea.

"We're going to get him over to a doctor here to make sure that they see the same things our guys are seeing," Roenicke said.

The scare came amid the Brewers' winning rally in what became a 5-3 victory on Sunday at Wrigley Field.

"It scared me," Cubs catcher Miguel Montero said. "I think it broke the helmet, too. As soon as it hit him, I saw a piece of plastic flying around. It was definitely really scary."

Strop was shaken, but was forced to regain his composure to continue pitching with the bases loaded and nobody out. He induced a Ryan Braun double play, with the first out coming at home plate, then walked Adam Lind intentionally to re-load the bases for Aramis Ramirez.

The Brewers caught a break when Ramirez muscled a broken-bat single over third base for the second two of his three RBIs.

Strop received word after the game that it appeared Segura would be OK.

"It was really scary," Strop said. "I heard he's doing all right, and obviously, we saw him stand up, but it was really scary.

"During the process, I had time to breathe and get back to where I needed to be. Their guys helped me out, telling me he was all right. [Carlos] Gomez and [Gerardo] Parra told me, 'He's all right, he's all right, he's all right.' That helped me get back to do what I had to do."

It was Segura's second beaning this season. On April 7, a pitch from Rockies starter Jordan Lyles glanced off the brim of Segura's helmet and struck him in the face. Segura remained in that game and did not miss any time.

"That's two in the helmet. That's not a good thing," Roenicke said. "You hope a guy doesn't get a little tentative in what he's doing. He does such a nice job doing the things we ask that you hope it doesn't start to bother him."

Adam McCalvy is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @AdamMcCalvy. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.