Beckham excelling in utility role for White Sox

After returning from a stint with the Angels, seven-year vet has played three positions

Beckham excelling in utility role for White Sox

MINNEAPOLIS -- The days of Gordon Beckham being asked about his offensive game haven't exactly disappeared. The days of this exceptional defensive player breaking down every nuance of his offensive approach stand as a thing of the past.

Beckham has no qualms talking about the super-utility role where he's currently excelling for the White Sox. The 28-year-old started at third base in Sunday's series finale, picking up a game's worth of at-bats after having just two pinch-hit opportunities this week.

Playing this role after being traded to the Angels in 2014 gave Beckham a greater understanding as to how it should be handled.

"Just being out there with that team, with the way they were going, it was more of a given of what I might be doing and stuff like that," Beckham said of his time in Anaheim. "I guess I just figured out there when you need to start locking in, in terms of getting ready to go in the game and stuff like that.

Beckham's game-tying single

"It's not easy. I'm still trying to figure it out. You have to be prepared, but not overly hyped. It's kind of hard to explain. The one thing you worry about a little bit, that was my first at-bat [Friday] in a week. ... It's more just get ready to go, get ready to find a way to get on base and help the team win and stuff like that."

There's now a greater working comprehension for Beckham of his swing in big league year No. 7, although that knowledge doesn't necessarily make it easier to maintain.

"I know it better because I know it better," Beckham said of his swing. "It's not necessarily because I'm getting at-bats or not getting at-bats. I don't know. I've got a better idea of what I'm doing.

"My swing and stuff this year is a lot different. It's a better swing. I know what I'm trying to do. I have a better feel. So that's good ... that you can go a week without having an at-bat and have it still be there for you. That's a positive thing. That's a huge move in the right direction."

Scott Merkin is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Merk's Works, and follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.