Bradley in good spirits, DL-bound after scare

Bradley in good spirits, DL-bound after scare

PHOENIX -- D-backs right-hander Archie Bradley remembers throwing a curveball to Carlos Gonzalez, but he doesn't recall the line drive that came off Gonzalez's bat at 115 mph (per Statcast) and struck him in the right cheek.

Incredibly, Bradley was back from the hospital and able to greet his teammates as they came back to the clubhouse following a 12-5 win over the Rockies on Tuesday night. But he still will be placed on the disabled list.

The game seemed secondary in the second inning when Bradley dropped to the ground.

"I tried to throw a curveball in there for a strike," Bradley said. "I saw the pitch going toward the plate and then I woke up, and I was laying down, and I was like, 'Oh, crap, what just happened?' I got myself together, opened my eyes, and I could see, wiggle my feet, and then the next thing I know the trainer was there, and they walked me through it from there."

The training staff eventually rolled Bradley over on his back and not long after that, he was sitting up and walking off the field under his own power.

Update on Bradley's scary moment

"For me, as a hitter, it was a nightmare," said a visibly shaken Gonzalez afterward. "It's something you don't try to do, especially to a guy like him, who is really young and is starting his career. It's devastating. It just ruined my night. It just ruined everybody's night."

The first thing Bradley did when he got to the clubhouse was call his mom and tell her he was OK and that he was going to the hospital. Once there he FaceTimed with her to reassure her even further, and he said, "It put a smile on her face."

Preliminary tests did not show a concussion, and Bradley was taken to St. Joseph's Hospital for a CT scan.

"There were some small changes in the sinus cavity," D-backs head athletic trainer Ken Crenshaw said. "We did another follow up with our facial specialist Dr. [Jeffrey] Edelstein. He thought it was really favorable from what he saw on the CT scan. He kind of wants to wait until tomorrow -- inflammation goes down -- and get a little better look at it, and we'll follow up with our ear, nose and throat specialist as well."

Until the swelling goes down the D-backs won't know for sure the extent of the damage, but at least for now it appears that this was a best-case scenario.

"His jaw looks great," Crenshaw said. "His orbit looks great. Vision is fine. All of those things look really well. It looks favorable. They just want to have a final read [Wednesday]."

Bradley tested after liner scare

Bradley was feeling well enough to greet his teammates after the game, and he briefly meet with the media, though, they were asked not to take pictures or video of his swollen face.

"It's not pretty to look in the mirror right now, I'll tell you that," said Bradley, who tweeted a selfie of his face. "You know it's part of the game. Obviously you hate to see it. It hurt pretty bad. It doesn't bother me to watch the replay. I've seen it 15, 20 times now. After watching it, it could have easily got me in the eye or directly in the face. I've got to think the Lord above is watching over me."

Bradley is headed for the disabled list, and the team is likely to call up a reliever, since another starter will not be needed until the next time through the rotation.

Hale on Bradley's status

The D-backs scored three runs in the first inning, but went down in order in bottom of the second and third innings following the injury to Bradley.

"It was scary," first baseman Paul Goldschmidt said. "I've never been a part of anything like that ever as a hitter, position player, teammate or on the other team. Fortunately, hopefully everything will be OK."

Steve Gilbert is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Inside the D-backs, and follow him on Twitter @SteveGilbertMLB. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.