Boston's healing continues on Patriots' Day

Boston's healing continues on Patriots' Day

BOSTON -- When the Red Sox face the Orioles today, the already significant Patriots' Day matchup will take on added meaning in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing's two-year anniversary.

The Red Sox have traditionally played at home on Patriots' Day, dating back to 1959. Taking place alongside one of the most prestigious long-distance races in the world, the game falls on one of the most important dates on Boston's cultural calendar. As in the past, the game is scheduled for a morning start, with first pitch set for 11:05 a.m. ET.

For members of the Red Sox, especially those present during the attacks of 2013, the memories of that day are still fresh with emotion.

"That will be a day that will live on," manager John Farrell said. "Each player has his own thoughts and relationships that each has developed with victims as they visit them in the hospital, the follow-up conversation and visits. Patriots' Day in and of itself is such a unique thing to us in New England, to Boston and particularly with the 11 [a.m.] start."

In the aftermath of the bombing, the Red Sox came to develop strong ties with several of the victims and their families, honoring them before and during games throughout the past two years. This season, those who suffered from the tragedy were given a spotlight during the organization's Opening Day pregame ceremony and again on One Boston Day, which featured a city-wide moment of silence during a game.

"I think, as in sports it always is, it's that thing that helps everyone keep moving," said righty Justin Masterson, who will start for Boston on Monday. "Keep going, keep growing. You stay in the past, you live in the past. You forget what's going forward. Every day we come out and do this, especially like tomorrow, it continues that drive forward. We're moving on. Not forgetting. That's what drives us to do greater, to be greater and impact."

Alec Shirkey is an associate reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.