Turner, Uribe day to day after being injured on successive plays

Backup infielder spiked on left hand; regular third baseman has tight hamstring

Turner, Uribe day to day after being injured on successive plays

PHOENIX -- Dodgers infielders Justin Turner and Juan Uribe were injured on successive plays in the bottom of the third inning of Saturday night's 6-0 loss to the D-backs. Both are day to day.

Turner left after getting spiked on the index finger of his left hand. X-rays were negative and the finger was tightly wrapped after the game.

He was replaced by Uribe, who felt tightness in his left hamstring on the next play, when he fielded a Paul Goldschmidt RBI groundout.

Uribe said he believed it was "not that bad" and was hopeful he could play Sunday. But Uribe was sidelined twice last year with persistent hamstring problems.

Turner's injury occurred with no outs in the third inning when A.J. Pollock attempted to steal third base. Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis threw on a bounce, Turner short-hopped and set the glove in front of the bag. Pollock's spikes hit the glove and Turner's left index finger, which he keeps out of the glove. The ball was knocked loose for an error.

"It's more long than deep," said Turner, who did not receive stitches for the cut on his finger. "I thought it was broken. The knuckle swelled up and I couldn't move it. X-rays were negative, so that's the good news."

Turner, who started at third base to give Uribe the night game off before Sunday's day game, had to leave and Uribe took over.

When play resumed, Goldschmidt hit a bouncer that Uribe gloved on the run to throw Goldschmidt out with a twisting motion. But when the inning ended, he walked to the dugout gingerly and was met by VP of medical services Stan Conte and was pinch-hit for by Alex Guerrero, who remained in the game to play third.

Manager Don Mattingly, who before the game said he was resting Uribe in part to avoid last year's hamstring problems, said after the game that didn't mean Uribe shouldn't be ready for duty.

"It wasn't really a day off," Mattingly said. "You don't ever call it a day off in the National League."

Ken Gurnick is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.