MLB.com Columnist

Bill Ladson

Desmond's errors prove costly for Nats, Scherzer

Desmond's errors prove costly for Nats, Scherzer

WASHINGTON -- Nationals shortstop Ian Desmond had an Opening Day he would like to forget. His two errors allowed the Mets to score three unearned runs in a 3-1 Nats loss at Nationals Park on Monday afternoon.

The first error came with two outs in the sixth inning with Max Scherzer working on a no-hitter. After Curtis Granderson drew a walk to reach first base, David Wright hit what look like an easy popup to second baseman Dan Uggla, who looked like he had a bead on the ball. But Desmond waved him off and the ball bounced off the tip of his glove and dropped for an error to put runners on second and third. Lucas Duda was the next hitter and singled to center field to end the no-no and drive in two runs.

Desmond said he was clearly at fault and should have allowed Uggla to catch the ball.

"It was pretty embarrassing," Desmond said. "I felt like one of those little leaguers. I just looked up and I didn't hear anything and I just kept on going for it. I didn't want to let it hit the ground, so I'm going to call it and try to get it."

Uggla put blame on himself, saying he should have been louder when it came to calling the ball.

"I wasn't loud enough. I have to be louder in that situation," Uggla said. "[Desmond] is the shortstop. If he doesn't hear anything or see anybody underneath it, he has to go after it. That's him being aggressive, and that's what makes him an awesome player."

An inning later, Desmond made a throwing error on the ball hit by Juan Lagares, who then scored on a triple by Travis d'Arnaud.

"I just rushed it, I had so much time," Desmond said. "These are all the quotes you could take from the last five years for the month of April. Hopefully, we can put this behind us quickly and get this next game going."

Bill Ladson is a reporter for MLB.com and writes an MLBlog, All Nats All the Time. He also can be found on Twitter @WashingNats. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.