Fan jumps from upper deck at Stadium

Fan jumps from upper deck at Yankee Stadium

NEW YORK -- A fan jumped from the upper deck during the eighth inning of Tuesday night's White Sox-Yankees game in the Bronx, delaying the game for four minutes.

The fan, 18-year-old Scott Harper, climbed up the net on his own power after spending several minutes sitting with a dazed look on his face. After reaching the stands, he was led away by stadium security before being taken from the ballpark on a gurney.

According to police, Harper was at the game with three friends, and the four had been discussing whether the protective netting would support Harper's weight. In the bottom of the eighth inning, with the Yankees trying to mount a late rally, Harper jumped over the railing on the upper deck, landing on the netting behind home plate.

Players and coaches from both teams saw Harper on the netting and went to the top of their dugouts to see what had happened. Fans cheered and snapped pictures while Harper sat on the netting with his head in his hands.

"I didn't see him fall. But I looked up and he was bouncing. I saw him bouncing on the net. That was crazy," said Chicago reliever Dustin Hermanson. "I've heard one other story about that happening before. I don't know what he did. He's lucky he landed on the net rather than somewhere else. Just think about those people sitting below the net and what could have happened."

"I've never seen anything like that before," said White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen.

Yankees manager Joe Torre had seen this very sight before, as another fan jumped from the upper deck on to the netting during the 2000 season.

"I was hoping I wouldn't see it again," Torre said. "I'm just glad that he was able to walk out."

Harper, from Armonk, N.Y., was taken from the ballpark wearing a neck brace. He was sent to Lincoln Hospital for observation, then placed under arrest.

Harper could be charged with reckless endangerment, criminal mischief, criminal trespassing and disorderly conduct. A police spokesperson declined to say whether alcohol was involved in the incident.

"That's New York; anything can happen," said Guillen. "That's the first time I've ever seen that. Thank God that kid was all right."

Mark Feinsand is a reporter for The Associated Press contributed to this report. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.