20 for '15: Big leaguers who shined wearing No. 15

20 for '15: Big leaguers who shined wearing No. 15

Plenty of players have worn No. 15 throughout the long history of baseball, and with 2015 upon us, MLB.com takes a look at 20 Major Leaguers who have excelled while wearing the number.

Here are the 20 for '15:

Dick Allen: He spent 15 years in a Major League uniform and played for five organizations. The 1964 National League Rookie of the Year made seven All-Star teams and hit .292 in his career. Allen spent the bulk of his career, nine seasons, with the Phillies, and won the 1972 American League MVP Award as a member of the White Sox.

Allen homers for the lead

Sandy Alomar Jr.: Across 20 Major League seasons, Alomar played for seven organizations and wore as many numbers, but he did don the No. 15 as a member of both the Indians and Rangers. Alomar was a six-time All-Star, the 1990 AL Rookie of the Year and also won a Gold Glove Award in '90.

Alomar's game-tying homer

Carlos Beltran: Perhaps best remembered for his historic postseason in 2004, Beltran cracks this list having worn No. 15 for four teams -- Royals, Mets, Astros and Giants. In the '04 postseason, as a member of the Astros, Beltran hit .435 with eight homers in 12 games. Over the course of his 17-year career, Beltran has made eight All-Star teams.

Beltran's two-homer Game 5

Cecil Cooper: Cooper, a five-time All-Star, wore No. 15 as a member of the Red Sox and Brewers. The first baseman hit .298 over his 17-year career. Cooper collected a Silver Slugger Award in 1980-82 and led the AL in RBIs in 1980 and '83.

Cooper's go-ahead single

Doug Drabek: Over the course of 13 seasons, Drabek played for five teams and wore 15 on four of them -- Pirates, Astros, Orioles and White Sox. The 1990 NL Cy Young Award winner finished his career with 155 wins and an ERA of 3.73.

Pirates win NL East

Jim Edmonds: One of the best to ever roam the outfield, Edmonds wore 15 for five teams -- Cardinals, Padres, Cubs, Brewers and Reds. Across 17 Major League seasons, Edmonds won eight Gold Glove Awards, including six in a row from 2000-05.

Edmonds robs LaRue of home run

George Foster: The left fielder wore the No. 15 for 15 of his 18 Major League seasons. Foster, a five-time All-Star, led the league in RBIs in three consecutive seasons from 1976-78. The 1977 NL MVP spent 11 seasons with the Reds.

Reds win it on wild pitch

Jerry Grote: A two-time All-Star, Grote was a mainstay at catcher for the Mets in the late '60s and early '70s. Grote spent 12 seasons with New York and played in more than 110 games eight times. Grote also spent time with the Dodgers, Royals and Astros.

Tim Hudson: A member of the 2014 World Series champion Giants, Hudson has worn No. 15 for 14 of his 16 Major League seasons. Hudson has been an All-Star twice in the AL as a member of the Athletics and twice in the NL, with the Braves and Giants. The right-hander has won 15 or more games in eight seasons and has a career ERA of 3.45.

Hudson's one-hit shutout

Davey Lopes: A four-time All-Star, Lopes was drafted by the Dodgers in 1968 and spent the first 10 seasons of his 16-year career in Los Angeles. He led the NL in stolen bases in 1975 (77) and '76 (63), and now tries to pass that knowledge along as the Dodgers' first-base coach. He continues to wear No. 15.

Tim McCarver: A two-time All-Star and two-time World Series champion, McCarver accomplished a lot in his 21-year career. He played for the Cardinals, Phillies, Red Sox and Expos before starting his career as a broadcaster. McCarver's success carried on even after his playing days concluded as he won the 2012 Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting.

Kevin Millar: He spent 12 seasons in the Majors and was a key component in the Red Sox 2004 World Series championship. Millar spent three years in Boston, five with the Marlins, three in Baltimore and one in Toronto. Millar hit .274 in his career and finished with 699 RBIs.

Millar's walk-off homer

Thurman Munson: The Yankees are the only team to have retired No. 15, doing so for their former captain. During his 11 seasons in pinstripes, Munson was a seven-time All-Star. The catcher also won the 1970 AL Rookie of the Year Award and the '76 AL MVP. Munson tragically passed away in 1979 after he was involved in a plane crash.

Munson's catch in foul territory

Larry Parrish: Across 15 Major League seasons, Parrish played for three clubs and made two All-Star teams. Parrish wore No. 15 as a member of the Expos and Rangers. Parrish is now the manager of the Toledo Mud Hens, the Triple-A affiliate of the Tigers.

Dustin Pedroia: If there's a baseball award you can think of, odds are Pedroia, 31, has won it. In nine seasons with the Red Sox, he has won a Rookie of the Year Award, four Gold Gloves, an AL MVP and a Silver Slugger. He is also a four-time All-Star and has won two World Series titles.

Pedroia's leadoff home run

Glen Perkins: A member of the 2004 Draft class, Perkins has evolved into Minnesota's top reliever. The left-hander was an All-Star the past two seasons and has spent his entire nine-year career as a member of the Twins.

Perkins shuts the door

Darrell Porter: Porter donned No. 15 in 15 of his 17 seasons. The catcher wore the number in Milwaukee, Kansas City and St. Louis. Porter made four All-Star teams throughout his career, including three in a row from 1978-80.

Royals turn two

Tim Salmon: The 1993 AL Rookie of the Year is a rare example of a player who spent his entire career with one organization. The California Angels drafted Salmon in 1989, and he played 14 Major League seasons after his debut in 1992.

Salmon sets homer record

Ben Sheets: A four-time All-Star, Sheets spent nine of his 10 seasons wearing No. 15. Sheets spent the bulk of his career in Milwaukee, but also played with the Athletics and Braves. The right-hander finished his career with a 3.78 ERA.

Video: Sheets strikes out 18

Joe Torre: It's hard to find a baseball career longer or more complete than that of Torre. Not only did he play 18 seasons, but he managed for 29 years and also had a stint as a broadcaster. And if that wasn't enough, Torre currently serves as MLB's Chief Baseball Officer. During his playing career, Torre was a nine-time All-Star and won the 1971 NL MVP. As a manager, he won six AL pennants and four World Series championships. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2014.

William Boor is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @wboor. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.