60-day Injured List

Definition

Note: As part of MLB's health and safety protocols during the COVID-19 pandemic, each club will have a 30-man roster for the first two weeks of the 2020 season, 28 for the next two weeks, and 26 for the remainder of the season. Teams will submit 60-man pools -- that is, the group of players who will be able to play for them this season. According to the league's Operating Manual, all players on a 40-man roster "that the club anticipates participating" during the season will be part of the player pool, while the rest will be made up of non-40-man roster players under contract. Each team will be permitted a three-player taxi squad for every road trip, giving them immediate options to replace an injured or COVID-19 infected player. There will be no limit on the number of pitchers on the active roster, or on position players pitching. Rather than a 10-day injured list for position players and 15-day injured list for pitchers, there will be a 10-day injured list for all players in the shortened season. The 60-day injured list will be reduced to 45 days. The 7-day injured list will be unaffected. There will also be a COVID-19 injured list with no minimum or maximum number of days per trip.

In a typical season, the 60-day injured list (known as the 60-day disabled list until the end of the 2018 season) is the longest of the four injured lists in Major League Baseball. Players placed on the 60-day injured must remain on it for a minimum of 60 days and are temporarily removed from a club's 40-man roster, which often makes the list a last resort for clubs.

If a club doesn't need a 40-man roster spot to replace an injured player, the player may be kept on the 10-day injured list or 15-day injured list longer than 60 days rather than being transferred to the 60-day injured list. That way, the club won't need to risk losing another player by going through the process to clear a spot on the 40-man roster when the injured player is ready to return.

History

After the 2018 season, the 7-day disabled list (or "DL"), 10-day disabled list and 60-day disabled list were renamed, becoming the 7-day injured list, the 10-day injured list and the 60-day injured list.

The decision to change the 15-day injured list to the 10-day injured list prior to the 2017 season did not affect the parameters of the 7-day injured list or the 60-day injured list. MLB brought back the 15-day injured list specifically for pitchers and two-way players (position players who are eligible to pitch in any circumstance) prior to the 2020 season. This also had no affect on the 7-day injured list or the 60-day injured list.