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Bryce Harper completed his checklist with a homer in every National League park

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Bryce Harper has already established quite the career resume, and he hasn't even hit his 25th birthday. Harper has been a four-time All-Star, a unanimous MVP and he already has over 130 homers. That power helped him reach another early milestone during Tuesday night's 8-4 victory over the Pirates.

In the ninth inning, Harper connected on a two-run blast into the Pittsburgh night that happened to find its way to a lucky Nationals fan. 

The picture-perfect swing allowed Harper to crush the ball 112.6 mph off the bat, the hardest homer he's hit against a left-handed pitcher in the Statcast Era (and his fourth-hardest overall).

This long ball gave Harper an even more remarkable feat, though -- PNC Park was the only ballpark in the National League where he had yet to go deep. He has now homered in all 15 NL parks, and he was aware that PNC was the last one remaining.

"Yeah, I've known that for years. Coming in, you always want to hit a homer and things like that, but that's not the only thing on my mind," he said to MLB.com's Bob Cohn. "Try to get good at-bats, and, if possible, get on base, and help the team win. I'm happy to scratch it off the list."

Naturally, 69 of his 134 bombs have come at home at Nationals Park ...

... but Philadelphia's Citizens Bank Park ranks No. 1 in Bryce visiting bombs with 12.

He's gone yard in Queens ...

... and the Queen City.

He'd already hit plenty of homers at Turner Field, and in just his second game at Atlanta's new SunTrust Park, Harper quickly checked that off the list. He added a second homer that night for good measure. 

Dodger Stadium, Wrigley Field, Miller Park; the list goes on.

Targets at the parks aren't that enticing for Harper, either -- power is power. "I mean, I can go anywhere," Harper said to Cohn. "It doesn't really matter where I play."

So that's the National League. As for the American League? Seven ballparks down, eight to go.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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