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Celebrate Vin Scully's 87th birthday with some of his greatest calls

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Vin Scully is not just the voice of the Dodgers, but for generations of people, he's the voice of baseball itself. His tone, his stories, his "Uggla means owl" facts have defined the game that we love. For many on the East Coast, where Dodgers games go until long after midnight, he's even narrated our dreams as we fell asleep to Scully's baseball lullaby.

On Saturday, Scully turned an impressive 87 years young. While Dodgers fans have a 66th season of Scully's broadcasting prowess to look forward to, the special occasion calls for us all to look back at the most memorable moments Scully has called over the years.

Scully has called plenty of big moments, like Sandy Koufax's perfect game. He even managed to drop in prose poetry like "A lot of people in the ballpark now are starting to see the pitches with their hearts. "

He was on hand to call Hank Aaron's 715th

And was there for the improbable turning into the impossible. 

When two-time Cy Young and William Tell-impersonator Clayton Kershaw threw a no-hitter in June, you better believe Scully was on hand

But what makes Scully so great isn't just his ability to call the milestones. It's the skill, humor and passion he brings to every moment. He changed up his signature call when the Dodgers were like Disney's The Rescuers and went Down Under

I mean, even Australian fans want to impersonate the man: 

Scully has busted out some So You Think You Can Dance-style criticism: 

And who knew he was such a gourmand?

Or a lover of classic literature?  

He can even make bird poop romantic.  

Scully was kind enough to recall the time he got Babe Ruth's autograph, kind of:

He even went full You Got Served! while breaking down a young fan's break-dance moves:

And toward the end of the 2014 season, Scully was lucky enough to call one of the, um, cuter double plays in Dodger Stadium's rich history:

Though Scully wasn't there, we can even imagine him calling Washington's crossing of the Delaware, too. 

"Washington, you'll remember, is no stranger to midnight tactics. The general's performance during the French and Indian War makes us think that he has to be considered a real threat to the British squad.

The first Durham boats are only a few feet away from the far bank now. The rest of the soldiers are looking on with as many butterflies in their chests as they have bullets in their muzzle bags."

Here's to another year of "It's time for Dodger baseball," and dozens upon dozens of other memorable moments. 

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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